Associations Between the Built Environment and Objective Measures of Sleep: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

Abstract:

Although dense neighborhood built environments support increased physical activity and lower obesity, these features may also disturb sleep. Therefore, we sought to understand the association between the built environment and objectively measured sleep. From 2010 to 2013, we analyzed data from examination 5 of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, a diverse population from 6 US cities. We fit multilevel models that assessed the association between the built environment (Street Smart Walk Score, social engagement destinations, street intersections, and population density) and sleep duration or efficiency from 1-week wrist actigraphy in 1,889 individuals. After adjustment for covariates, a 1-standard-deviation increase in Street Smart Walk Score was associated with 23% higher odds of short sleep duration (=6 hours; odds ratio = 1.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.0, 1.4), as well as shorter average sleep duration (mean difference = -8.1 minutes, 95% confidence interval: -12.1, -4.2). Results were consistent across other built environment measures. Associations were attenuated after adjustment for survey-based measure of neighborhood noise. Dense neighborhood development may have multiple health consequence. In promoting denser neighborhoods to increase walkability, it is important to also implement strategies that reduce the adverse impacts of this development on sleep, such as noise reductions efforts.

SEEK ID: https://research-sharing.cesgo.org/publications/18

PubMed ID: 29547912

Projects: No Projects

Publication type: Not specified

Journal: Am J Epidemiol

Citation: Am J Epidemiol. 2018 Mar 14. pii: 4935066. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwx302.

Date Published: No date defined

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Authors: D. A. Johnson, J. A. Hirsch, K. A. Moore, S. Redline, A. V. Diez Roux

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Created: 20th Mar 2018 at 13:58

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